[WATCH] Mortal Kombat 2021~ #Movie HD Full — ONLINE (Free) English

English →>Mortal Kombat # 2021®

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Rating: R (some coarse references | full language | strong bloody violence)
Genre: Action, Fantasy, Adventure
Original Language: English
Director: Simon McQuoid
Producer: James Wan, Todd Garner
Writer: Greg Russo, Dave Callaham
Release date (theaters): April 23, 2021 overall
Release date (streaming): April 23, 2021
Run time: 1h 50m
Production co: Broken Road Productions, New Line Cinema, Atomic Monster, Warner Bros., NetherRealm Studios
Aspect ratio: Scope (2.35: 1)
We’ve been analyzing tons of information and goodies from the cast and crew of the upcoming Mortal Kombat film, all of which makes me very excited. But at a certain point, talking is just talking. How does the film look, feel, reproduce?

Although we still need to wait a little longer to see the full feature Mortal Kombat, we were lucky to catch the opening prologue sequence, about 13 minutes in total. And I found the experience blunt, intriguingly filmed, very well executed and, best of all — surprisingly emotional. I have some complaints in its editing rhythms, but, in general, I found this first look a captivating opening and, to use Shang Tsung’s jargon, a promising flavor of what is to come.
The sequel serves as originating mini-stories for two of Mortal Kombat’s most iconic characters since the first game: Scorpion and Sub-Zero. But here, we are introduced to them as Hanzo Hasashi (Hiroyuki Sanada) and Bi-Han (Joe Taslim), two warrior ninjas from rival factions. And while Bi-Han can use the magical power to freeze from the beginning in this introduction, Hanzo’s use of the “come here” spear seems more based on a sort of Batman Begins; it is something that he grabs and shoots, doesn’t shoot from his infernal hands. But more about your weapons and fighting tactics at a time…
The first thing we see in Mortal Kombat is, strangely, peace. A quiet cabin where Hanzo takes care of his wife and son. Smiling, loving and even playful faces, represented with space and stillness by director Simon McQuoid, whose sense of efficient visual narrative and mastery of production design is evident in the first frame. I think, frankly, a courage to open a fantasy of martial arts of great budget with so much domestic simplicity, and I find more than effective in aligning ourselves with the emotional affection and the journey of the characters.
But peace cannot last that long. When Hanzo leaves to fetch buckets of water, Bi-Han and his clan attack. The first act of violence and bloodshed is not hoarseness or malice. It is the abject and terrifying image, tinged with horror, of a gun cutting through a paper window, blood dripping and spouting as it descends. I am not moved by this image, I am shocked and sad. How am I already moved by a Mortal Kombat movie?
Bi-Han is here to find and exterminate Hanzo and his family, and the moments of suspense and villainy remind me a lot of the opening sequence of Inglourious Basterds, in which our villain Hans Landa breaks into a hut to find the Jewish family hidden in the middle of the floor boards. But while this scene slowly increases to a place of almost unbearable tension before it explodes with shots, this scene reaches its moment of loss and violence much faster. And, of course, it explodes in martial arts combat.
When Hanzo returns to find his family wiped out, his wife on a literal block of ice, the sadness can only live by itself for a while, before turning to anger. A group of fighters is here to finish the job and Hanzo must fight back. Then, he grabs that Scorpion spear and annihilates them like hell. This multi-person fighting scene is kinetic and exciting, with a lot of horrible contact and lovely choreography beats. I love the moments when the camera revolves around our fighters in longer shots, allowing artists to fight unadorned — in addition, it gives us ample opportunity to watch Sanada emote while he punches. I will say that the editing rhythms can be a little too fast for me, losing some of the attractive fluidity and authenticity of the fight in a barrage of impact cuts, shocking insertions and stressful reorientations. I hope this is a unique editing style for this opening fight; otherwise, I fear that some of the best moments will be confused on the block.
When the fight is over, Bi-Han appears again to defeat and insult Hanzo. Here, the film’s emphasis on an authentically multicultural cast shines brightly, as the two share lines of dialogue alternating between Chinese and Japanese, even commenting on how they come from such different worlds and cannot understand each other. It is another surprising use of space and character for the film to plunge well into a time of culminating conflict. And when this sequence ends with Bi-Han prevailing (for now), the title card appears slowly, leaving me absolutely ready for more.

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When you think of Mortal Kombat, you think of blood. Buckets of that. That kind of horrible splash that comes from “kali ma shakti de” — an opponent in a wild fight to the death. But blood, as director Simon McQuoid thought for the restart of the videogame-inspired film, has many meanings. “Blood represents the family,” he tells EW. “Blood represents a connection. Blood represents who we are. Without getting too complicated, what we did was use blood in execution. ” And it starts to flow from the beginning.
If this new vision of Mortal Kombat, revealed in the first exclusive photos from EW, is a “blood universe”, then McQuoid says that the kunai blade is at its center. It is the characteristic weapon of the fan favorite character, Hanzo Hasashi, also known as Scorpion, played by Hiroyuki Sanada, star of The Wolverine and The Twilight Samurai. “We did some research and the kunai is actually an old Japanese gardening tool,” explains the director. “So one of the first scenes in the film is the kunai blade being used as a gardening tool by Hanzo’s wife.”
Mortal Kombat, produced by Todd Garner and James Wan of Aquaman, begins with a crucial piece of the original game’s tradition: the blood rivalry between the Hanzo and Bi-Han clans (Warrior’s Joe Taslim). The 10-minute opening sequence starts in feudal Japan, long before these fighters exert supernatural abilities like Scorpio and Sub-Zero, and ends in “a very unpleasant hand-to-hand combat” between the two, says McQuoid. That is why the debuting filmmaker cast Sanada and Taslim, two actors known for their martial arts prowess. “[Hanzo] is the leader of a ninja clan and he is strong, but also … in the beginning, he is a peaceful family man,” says Sanada. “It’s like a family drama with excitingly brutal fights. This is the image of the film for me ”, he adds.
Bi-Han and Hanzo’s story “needed to be told during the fight,” says McQuoid. “There are some great camera movements to add some dynamism, which makes it really enjoyable. We needed it to be really elementary and really brutal. It is not a brilliant film … I wanted dirt and grime to appear. ”
This brutality continues to the present, where we meet Cole Young, a totally new character in the world of Mortal Kombat played by actor and martial artist Lewis Tan (Wu Assassins, Into the Badlands), someone who prides himself on performing his own stunts despite the pains and sufferings that come throughout the training.
“When we met Cole, he was in a very bad position,” said Tan. “He’s out of luck. He is a failed MMA fighter, who was a champion, who believed in himself, who had a lot of hope in his career. And it all went down the drain. It’s a very interesting place for a hero to start, and I think that, along the journey of Mortal Kombat and Cole discovering where he comes from, you are introduced to all these other iconic characters and elements that everyone loves so much. “
Cole knows nothing about his inheritance, except the mysterious birthmark on his chest — in the form of the Mortal Kombat symbol. Tan remains silent about how this birthmark connects to the character’s origins, but agrees that “it is a unique symbol” that “will eventually connect with the journey he is taking”. It remains the only clue that Cole has when the sinister sorcerer and emperor of the Outworld realm, Shang Tsung (Chin Han of the skyscraper), sends Sub-Zero, now with his cryogenic powers, to hunt him down.
Major Jackson “Jax” Briggs (Mehcad Brooks of Supergirl), a special forces major who carries the same brand as Cole, encourages him to seek out Sonya Blade (Jessica McNamee of The Meg). She takes him to the next stage of the journey, to the mighty Elder God known as Lord Raiden (Thor’s Tadanobu Asano), who grants sanctuary in his temple to all those with the mark. There, Cole encounters even more recognizable characters from the Mortal Kombat games — Liu Kang (Ludi Lin of the Power Rangers), Kung Lao (actor and stuntman Max Huang) and Kano (Josh Lawson of the Superstore) — while everyone trains for a high-profile tournament. bets to defeat the invading enemies of Outworld.

Tan is familiar with the idea of ​​a legacy. His father, Philip Tan, a national martial arts champion, started his film career on Tim Burton’s Batman and he progressed to a fight choreographer, stunt coordinator and second unit director. Tan has fond memories of rolling on the stunt mats on film sets as a child. Mortal Kombat now marks the actor’s first leading role in a high-profile feature film from the studio that launched his father’s career. Tan also realizes the legacy of the original games.
“I play the game since I was a child,” he says. “For lack of a better way to describe it, you don’t want to mess it up because it’s so iconic. You want to bring something new to the table that people haven’t seen before, but at the same time, they really respect and honor these legendary worlds that have already been created. “
Cole is certainly something that fans have never seen before. While many players can invoke unique fighting moves of familiar names, such as Mileena’s daggers (played by actress Sisi Stringer), Tan used his own experience to develop a new style for Cole. He took from that UFC fighter Jorge Masvidal that “grain of salt from the earth”, while also playing muay thai (also known as Thai kickboxing), judo, jujitsu and “MMA roots”.
“I wanted to make sure that everyone respected the material, the Mortal Kombat tradition, the fans and their love for it. Everyone was clear about that, ”said McQuoid about the development of the reboot. Respect for the material also meant leaning towards what makes Mortal Kombat so popular after all these years. Blood has a lot to do with it.
As a joke, McQuoid told stunt coordinator Kyle Gardiner to create “the best fighting sequences ever made in a film.” In reality, these action pieces are some of the most watched elements of the film that came out of the first test screenings, according to McQuoid and Tan. “We need to be smart about how we handle [struggles],” notes the director, “and there are times when you’ll see when to watch the movie, when it’s just‘ F — — that! some fun. ’”
McQuoid is still editing the film, but he already knows that “it definitely won’t be rated PG-13”.
“Out of context, this quote may seem incendiary, isn’t it: the rules around ratings are not what many people think they are,” he says. “It is a quantity of blood, it is a quantity of red, it is the interpretation of how you do it. We had a lot of discussions about how to get the balance right, so there was clotted blood and there were deaths. ” He pauses to repeat what he just said. “And there is blood, blood and deaths.”
Fatalities, such as dramatic game ending moves, which often involve cutting someone completely in half or pulling someone’s spine, will be noticed for the first time in a Mortal Kombat movie. “There are some crazy fatalities,” confirms Tan. “We chose some iconic ones. There are a lot of really cool exclusive moves that you’re going to see, a lot of Easter eggs that we put in the movie, but there are some really hard fatalities that I can’t wait to see on the big screen. They’re brutal, man. They, they don’t stop. “At the same time, McQuoid” did not want to enter NC-17 territory. “ He notes: “It’s amazing how quickly you can get there. It doesn’t take much. ” At least not for a Mortal Kombat movie.